Mental Health and the Justice System in Durham County

Project Summary

Mental Illness is over-represented in the incarcerated population, and is correlated with higher rates of re-arrest.  In recent years, Durham County has taken many steps to break this unfortunate cycle, including helping incarcerated people to engage with mental health treatment resources.  This team will work with collaborators at the Durham County Detention Facility, the Criminal Justice Resource Center, and the Duke Health System to determine if recently-incarcerated people in Durham are using the resources available to them, and if outcomes are improving.  The team will use descriptive statistics and construct statistical models, and welcomes students from all majors, especially those interested in mental health and policy.  This team is a combined Data +/Bass Connections project, so students will be expected to commit to the project for Summer 2020 as well as academic year 2020-2021. 

Project Leads: Nicole Schramm-Sapyta, Maria Tackett

Project Manager: Ruth Wygle

Themes and Categories
Year
2020
Contact
Paul Bendich
Mathematics
bendich@math.duke.edu

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