Charting and Mapping Vaccine Development Capacities

Project Summary

With the significant international consequences of recent outbreaks, the ITP Lab conducted extensive stakeholder interviews and macro-level health policy analysis to expose gaps in pandemic preparedness and develop legal frameworks for future threats. 

Themes and Categories
Year

Project Team

  • Malcolm Nowlin, Public Policy & Chemistry
  • Nora Ghanem, Public Policy & Global Health
  • Niveen Hennein, Public Policy & Global Health
  • Julia Tuttle, Global Health & Cultural Anthropology
  • Courtney Scoufis. Public Policy & Global Health
  • Farrukh Jadoon, Computer Science
  • Christina Langmack, Public Policy & Global Health
  • Kushal Kadakhia|, Public Policy & Global Health 

Mentors: 

  • ProfessorJuliaBarnes-Weise, Duke
  • ProfessorAnaSantos-Rutschman, Duke 

Funding:

Project Details

Emerging danger:

  • Scientists and public health experts have identified several key pathogens that have caused or are likely to cause severe outbreaks and have few or no medical interventions available 

Updateable mapping tool:

  • Online geospatial database with search capabilities that allow for :
    • Filtering by region, country, and pathogen
    • Clickable markers that reveal further details of organization
    • Bubble Map that displays linkages between organizations and their roles in development
  • Able to provide critical knowledge of vaccine development landscape and facilitate the formation of alliances 

Download the poster presentation for more details (PDF).

 

Related Projects

A large and growing trove of patient, clinical, and organizational data is collected as a part of the “Help Desk” program at Durham’s Lincoln Community Health Center. Help Desk is a group of student volunteers who connect with patients over the phone and help them navigate to community resources (like food assistance programs, legal aid, or employment centers). Data-driven approaches to identifying service gaps, understanding the patient population, and uncovering unseen trends are important for improving patient health and advocating for the necessity of these resources. Disparities in food security, economic stability, education, neighborhood and physical environment, community and social context, and access to the healthcare system are crucial social determinants of health, which studies indicate account for nearly 70% of all health outcomes.

Our team members have spent the summer working with the North Carolina Division of Public Health Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch to build a pilot environmental public health data dashboard, with the hope that the pilot tool will be used in DPH’s grant proposal to the CDC for a fully-funded tool. The pilot tool, which is a Tableau dashboard, displays population, health, and environmental data for North Carolina counties and census tracts. The project involved data processing in R, the creation of a detailed metadata table, and building interactive visualizations Tableau.

Project Leads: Mike Dolan Fliss, Kim Gaetz

Project Manager: Melyssa Minto

 

Click here to view the team's final project poster

 

Watch the team's final presentation (on Zoom) here:

Our team examined the relationship between race and home values across several units of analysis (household, address, HOLC rating area, census block, block group, and tract) in Durham, NC. We combined data from the decennial censuses (1940-2010), American Community Survey (2005-2018), Durham County Register of Deeds (1997-2020), and Durham County Tax Administration (1997-2021). We find that home values are strongly associated with the racial composition of areas, that homes in black neighborhoods are worth less, and that they accumulate less value over time.

Project Leads: William Darity Jr.

Project Manager: Omer Ali

Click here to view the team's final project slides

 

Watch the team's final presentation (on Zoom) here: