Charting and Mapping Vaccine Development Capacities

Project Summary

With the significant international consequences of recent outbreaks, the ITP Lab conducted extensive stakeholder interviews and macro-level health policy analysis to expose gaps in pandemic preparedness and develop legal frameworks for future threats. 

Themes and Categories
Year

Project Team

  • Malcolm Nowlin, Public Policy & Chemistry
  • Nora Ghanem, Public Policy & Global Health
  • Niveen Hennein, Public Policy & Global Health
  • Julia Tuttle, Global Health & Cultural Anthropology
  • Courtney Scoufis. Public Policy & Global Health
  • Farrukh Jadoon, Computer Science
  • Christina Langmack, Public Policy & Global Health
  • Kushal Kadakhia|, Public Policy & Global Health 

Mentors: 

  • ProfessorJuliaBarnes-Weise, Duke
  • ProfessorAnaSantos-Rutschman, Duke 

Funding:

Project Details

Emerging danger:

  • Scientists and public health experts have identified several key pathogens that have caused or are likely to cause severe outbreaks and have few or no medical interventions available 

Updateable mapping tool:

  • Online geospatial database with search capabilities that allow for :
    • Filtering by region, country, and pathogen
    • Clickable markers that reveal further details of organization
    • Bubble Map that displays linkages between organizations and their roles in development
  • Able to provide critical knowledge of vaccine development landscape and facilitate the formation of alliances 

Download the poster presentation for more details (PDF).

 

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