Triangle Census Research Network

Project Summary

The Triangle Census Research Network (TCRN) is an interdisciplinary team of researchers from Duke University and the National Institute of Statistical Sciences dedicated to improving the way that federal statistical agencies collect, analyze, and disseminate data to the public.

Themes and Categories
Year
Contact
Jerry Reiter
Statistical Science
jerry@stat.duke.edu

Its primary mission is to develop broadly-applicable methodologies that transform and improve data dissemination practice in the federal statistical system. It offers a variety of educational activities on advanced statistical modeling and official statistics for students, researchers, and staff of federal agencies. The TCRN is funded by the National Science Foundation in partnership with the Census Bureau under the NSF-NCRN-MN grant mechanism.

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Read the latest updates about this ongoing project by visiting Dr. Mattingly's Gerrymandering blog.

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Click here to read the Executive Summary

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