Geometric Analysis of Musical Audio Data

Project Summary

In this work, we turn musical audio time series data into shapes for various tasks in music matching and musical structure understanding. 

Themes and Categories
Contact
Christopher Tralie
Electrical and Computer Engineering
chris.tralie@gmail.com

In particular, we use sliding window representations of chunks of audio to create high dimensional time-ordered point clouds, and we extract information by analyzing the geometry of these clouds.  We have shown, for example, that sequences of these shapes can be used to identify two different versions of the same song, or "cover songs."  We have also shown that both local and global musical properties can be expressed in geometric language.  For instance, hip hop is very "wiggly" while classical music is very "smooth."  Choruses and verses tend to live in distinct clusters connected by paths, and "bridges," or detours to a different musical idea, show up as large loops.

Related People

Related Projects

How are women influenced by the spaces that they are allowed to occupy? A group of students, led by English Professor Charlotte Sussman, will examine how the spaces and places women can inhabit have changed over time, and how such changes have affected women’s rights and opportunities. The team will analyze the visual representations of women depicted in magazines from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century through the Women’s Magazine Archive, considering how images about women influence the reality that women can both imagine and live. Using this data, the group will design and visualize a potential women’s space that can empower and support women to reach their highest potential.

What do we mean by the term “poverty”?

A team of students under the direction of Professor Astrid Giugni will analyze how the way we talk about poverty and public policy has changed over time. The team will work with two databases containing visual, textual, and audio documents from 1473 to the present, allowing students to track and analyze how our understanding of poverty has changed over time. The group will tackle the challenge of analyzing the political and popular language and imagery of poverty in order to create a visualization that contextualizes how financial and welfare policy is influenced by how we talk about poverty.

Students in the Performance and Technology Class create a series of performances that explore the interface between society and our machines. With the theme of the cloud to guide them, they have created increasingly complex art using digital media, microcontrollers, and motion tracking. Their work will be on display at the Duke Choreolab 2016.