CovIdentify

Project Summary

Sean Fiscus (Math/Econ/EnvEng), Alyssa Shi (Stats), Yamil Lopez-Ruiz (BME/CS), Emmanuel Mokel (Stats/Math) spent ten weeks working with data from CovIdentify, a study that focuses on using wearables to predict and diagnose COVID-19 and the Flu. The team improved the memory efficiency of analytic pipelines, and added capacity to ingest different types of data. This project built upon the work accomplished by the Duke Bass Connections team and the Duke MIDS capstone project.

 

View the team's project poster here

Watch the team's final presentation on Zoom:

 

Project Lead: Jessilyn Dunn

Themes and Categories
Year
2021
Contact
Paul Bendich
Mathematics
bendich@math.duke.edu

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