Art Markets: Paris Paintings

Project Summary

What drove the prices for paintings in 18th Century Paris?

Themes and Categories
Year
Contact
Paul Bendich
bendich@math.duke.edu

Graduate students: Hilary Cronheim and Sandra van Ginhoven, Duke Art, Law and Markets Initiative-DALMI

Faculty instructor: Mine Çetinkaya-Rundel

Course: STA112FS Better Living Through Data Science: Exploring/Modeling/Predicting/Understanding

What drove the prices for paintings in 18th Century Paris?

  • Auction price data
  • Visual characteristics of paintings
  • Sales information
  • Art dealers’ strategies

Methods used:

  • Data exploration
  • Variable interactions
  • Model fit and selection
  • Interaction variables
  • Prediction

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