American Predatory Lending & the Global Financial Crisis

Project Summary

Jett Hollister (Mechanical Engineering) and Lexx Pino (Computer Science, Math) joined Economics majors Shengxi Hao and Cameron Polo in a ten week study of the late 2000s housing bubble. The team scraped, merged, and analyzed a variety of datasets to investigate different proposed causes of the bubble. They also created interactive visualizations of their data which will eventually appear on a website for public consumption.

Click here to read the Executive Summary

 

Faculty Lead: Lee Reiners

Project Manager: Kate Coulter

Themes and Categories
Year
2019
Contact
Paul Bendich
Mathematics
bendich@math.duke.edu

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Click here to view the project team's poster

 

Watch the team's final presentation (on Zoom) here: