Interactive environmental data applications

Project Summary

Molly Rosenstein, an Earth and Ocean Sciences major and Tess Harper, an Environmental Science and Spanish major spent ten weeks developing interactive data applications for use in Environmental Science 101, taught by Rebecca Vidra.

Contact
Paul Bendich
mathematics
bendich@math.duke.edu

Project Results

The team created 6 applications, including ones on climate change and mountaintop mining, and tested them out on the entire Data+ program.

Download the executive summary (PDF).

Disciplines Involved


The team at work in Gross 330

  • Environmental Science
  • Computer Science

Project Team

Undergraduates: Tess Harper and Molly Rosenstein

Client: Rebecca Vidra, Director of Undergraduate Studies, Env. Sci.and Policy

Project Mentors:

  • Aaron Berdanier, graduate student, Forest Ecology
  • Matt Ross, graduate student, Ecology

Learn More

See how work from this project resulted in a website to visualize the changes to the Appalachians from mining.

How the Coal Industry Flattened the Mountains of Appalachia (New York Times)

Scientists Have Now Quantified Mountaintop Removal Mining’s Destruction Of Appalachia (Thinkprogress.org)

Coal mining has flattened Appalachia by 40%: Scientists reveal dramatic extent of damage done by mountaintop removal (Dailymail.com)

Central Appalachia Flatter Due to Mountaintop Mining (Duke Today)

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