Quantifying Phenotypic Evolution during Tumor Growth

Project Summary

A team of students led by Duke mathematician Marc Ryser and University of Southern California Pathology professor Darryl Shibata will characterize phenotypic evolution during the growth of human colorectal tumors. 

Themes and Categories
Contact
Paul Bendich
Mathematics
bendich@math.duke.edu

Students will perform an in-depth investigation of phenotypic conservation at multiple functional levels in epigenomic methylation data - including CpG sites, genes, and functional groups within genes - and identify biologically relevant pathways that are preferentially conserved during growth. Students may have the opportunity to develop a clinically impactful epigenomic classifier for tumor aggressiveness and patient outcome.

Faculty Leads: Marc Ryser Darryl Shibata

Project Manager: Lidea Shahidi, Ph.D. Candidate, ECE

Student Team: Yanlin MaKevin Murgas

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