Geometry of Weather

Project Summary

Joy Patel (Math and CompSci) and Hans Riess (Math) spent ten weeks analyzing massive amounts of simulated weather data supplied by Spectral Sciences Inc. Their goal was to investigate ways in which advanced mathematical techniques could assist in quantifying storm intensity, helping to augment today's more qualitatively-based methods.

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Contact
Paul Bendich
bendich@math.duke.edu

Project Results: The team used a mixture of novel geometric and topological methods, as well as eye-detection techniques, and built a classifier that performed very well on strong storms. They presented their work in several venues, including at the Air Force Research Laboratories in Rome, NY.

Download the Executive Summary

Faculty Sponsor: John Harer, Duke University Department of Mathematics and Electrical and Computer Engineering

Project Managers: Justin Curry (Math) and Francis Motta (Math)

Team Members: Joy Patel and Hans Riess

 

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