Research

Research projects at Rhodes iiD focus on building connections. We encourage crosspollination of ideas across disciplines, and to develop new forms of collaboration that will advance research and education across the full spectrum of disciplines at Duke. The topics below show areas of research focus at Rhodes iiD. See all of our research.

Social and environmental contexts are increasingly recognized as factors that impact health outcomes of patients. This team will have the opportunity to collaborate directly with clinicians and medical data in a real-world setting. They will examine the association between social determinants with risk prediction for hospital admissions, and to assess whether social determinants bias that risk in a systematic way. Applied methods will include machine learning, risk prediction, and assessment of bias. This Data+ project is sponsored by the Forge, Duke's center for actionable data science.

Project Leads: Shelly Rusincovitch, Ricardo Henao, Azalea Kim

Project Manager: Austin Talbot

Aaron Chai (Computer Sciece, Math) and Victoria Worsham (Economics, Math) spent ten weeks building tools to understand characteristics of successful oil and gas licenses in the North Sea. The team used data-scraping, merging, and OCR method to create a dataset containing license information and work obligations, and they also produced ArcGIS visualizations of license and well locations. They had the chance to consult frequently with analytics professionals at ExxonMobil.

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Project Lead: Kyle Bradbury

Project Manager: Artem Streltsov

Yueru Li (Math) and Jiacheng Fan (Economics, Finance) spent ten weeks investigating abnormal behavior by companies bidding for oil and gas rights in the Gulf of Mexico. Working with data provided by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management and ExxonMobil, the team used outlier detection methods to automate the flagging of abnormal behavior, and then used statistical methods to examine various factors that might predict such behavior. They had the chance to consult frequently with analytics professionals at ExxonMobil.

 

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Project Lead: Kyle Bradbury

Project Manager: Hyeongyul Roh

Team A: Video data extraction

Alexander Bendeck (Computer Science, Statistics) and Niyaz Nurbhasha (Economics) spent ten weeks building tools to extract player and ball movement in basketball games. Using freely available broadcast-angle video footage which required much cleaning and pre-processing, the team used OpenPose software and employed neural network methodologies. Their pipeline fed into the predictive models of Team C.

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Team B: Modeling basketball data: offense

Anshul Shah (Computer Science, Statistics), Jack Lichtenstein (Statistics), and Will Schmidt (Mechanical Engineering) spent ten weeks building tools to analyze offensive play in basketball. Using 2014-5 Duke Men’s Basketball player-tracking data provided by SportVU, the team constructed statistical models that explored the relationship between different metrics of offensive productivity, and also used computational geometry methods to analyze the off-ball “gravity” of an offensive player.

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Team C: Modeling basketball data: defense

Lukengu Tshiteya (Statistics), Wenge Xie (ECE), and Joe Zuo (Computer Science, Statistics) spent ten weeks building tools to predict player movement in basketball games. Using SportVU data, including some pre-processed by Team A, the team built predictive RNN models that distinguish between 6 typical movement types, and created interactive visualizations of their findings in R Shiny.

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Team D: Visualizing basketball data

Shixing Cao (ECE) and Jackson Hubbard (Computer Science, Statistics) spent ten weeks building visualizations to help analyze basketball games. Using player tracking data from Duke basketball games, the team created visualizations of gameflow, networks of points and assists, and integrated all of their tools into an R Shiny app.

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Faculty Leads: Alexander Volfovsky, James Moody, Katherine Heller

Project Managers: Fan Bu, Heather Matthews, Harsh Parikh, Joe Zuo

Yanchen Ou (Computer Science) and Jiwoo Song (Chemistry, Mechanical Engineering) spent ten weeks building tools to assist in the analysis of smart meter data. Working with a large dataset of transformer and household data from the Kyrgyz Republic, the team built a data preprocessing pipeline and then used unsupervised machine-learning techniques to assess energy quality and construct typical user profiles.

 

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Faculty Lead: Robyn Meeks

Project Manager: Bernard Coles

Bernice Meja (Philosophy, Physics), Jessica Yang (Computer Science, ECE), and Tracey Chen (Computer Science, Mechanical Engineering) spent ten weeks building methods for Duke’s Office of Information Technology (OIT) to better understand information arising from “smart” (IoT) devices on campus. Working with data provided by an IoT testbed set up by OIT professionals, the team used a mixture of supervised and unsupervised machine-learning techniques and built a prototype device classifier.

 

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Project Lead: Will Brockselsby

Interested in understanding the types of attacks targeting Duke and other universities?  Led by OIT and the IT Security Office, students will learn to analyze threat intelligence data to identify trends and patterns of attacks.  Duke blocks an average of 1.5 billion malicious connection attempts/day and is working with other universities to share the attack data.  One untapped area is research into the types of attacks and learning how universities are targeted.  Students will collaborate alongside the security and IT professionals in analyzing the data and with the intent to discern patterns.

Project Lead: Jesse Bowling

Project Manager: Susan Jacobs

Katelyn Chang (Computer Science, Math) and Haynes Lynch (Environmental Science, Policy) spent ten weeks building tools to analyze and visualize geospatial and remote sensing data arising from the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge (ARNWR). The team produced interactive maps of physical characteristics that were tailored to specific refuge management professionals, and also built classifiers for vegetation detection in LandSat imagery.

 

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Faculty Leads: Justin Wright, Emily Bernhardt

Project Manager: Emily Ury

Dennis Harrsch, Jr. ( Computer Science ), Elizabeth Loschiavo ( Sociology ), and Zhixue (Mary) Wang ( Computer Science, Statistics ) spent ten weeks improving upon the team’s web platform that allows users to examine contraceptive use in low and middle income (LMIC) countries collected by the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) contraceptive calendar. The team improved load times, data visualization latency, and increased the number of country surveys available in the platform from 3 to 55. The team also created a new app that allows users to explore the results of machine learning using this big data set.

This project will continue into the academic year via Bass Connections where student teams will refine the machine learning model results and explore the question of whether and how policymakers can use these tools to improve family planning in LMIC settings.

 

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Faculty Lead: Megan Huchko

Project Manager: Amy Finnegan

Nathaniel Choe (ECE) and Mashal Ali (Neuroscience) spent ten weeks developing machine-learning tools to analyze urodynamic detrusor pressure data of pediatric spina bifida patients from the Duke University Hospital. The team built a pipeline that went from raw time series data to signal analysis to dimension reduction to classification, and has the potential to assist in clinician diagnosis.

 

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Faculty Leads: Wilkins Aquino, Jonathan Routh

Project Manager: Zekun Cao

Varun Nair (Economics, Physics), Paul Rhee (Computer Science), Jichen Yang (Computer Science, ECE), and Fanjie Kong (Computer Vision) spent ten weeks helping to adapt deep learning techniques to inform energy access decisions.

 

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Faculty Lead: Kyle Bradbury

Project Manager: Fanjie Kong

Yoav Kargon (Mechanical Engineering) and Tommy Lin (Chemistry, Computer Science) spent ten weeks working with data from the Water Quality Portal (WQP), a large national dataset of water quality measurements aggregated by the USGS and EPA. The team went all the way from raw data to the production of Pondr, an interactive and comprehensive tool built with R Shiny that permits users to investigate and visualize data coverage, values, and trends from the WQP.

 

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Faculty Lead: Jim Heffernan

Project Manager: Nick Bruns

Marco Gonazales Blancas (Civil Engineering) and Mengjie Xiu (Masters, BioStatistics) spent ten weeks building tools to help Duke reduce its energy footprint and achieve carbon neutrality by 2024. The team processed and analyzed troves of utility consumption data and then created practical monthly energy use reports for each school at Duke. These reports show historical usage trends, provide energy benchmarks for comparison, and make practical suggestions for energy savings.

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Faculty Lead: Billy Pizer

Project Manager: Sophia Ziwei Zhu

Cathy Lee (Statistics) and Jennifer Zheng (Math, Emory University) spent ten weeks building tools to help Duke University Libraries better understand its journal purchasing practice. Using a combination of web-scraping and data-merging algorithms, the team created a dashboard to help library strategists visualize and optimize journal selection.

 

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Faculty Leads: Angela Zoss, Jeff Kosokoff

Project Manager: Chi Liu

 Micalyn Struble (Computer Science, Public Policy), Xiaoqiao Xing (Economics), and Eric Zhang (Math) spent ten weeks exploring the use of neuroscience as evidence in criminal trials. Working with a large set of case files downloaded from WestLaw, the team used natural language processing to build a predictive model that has the potential to automate the process of locating relevant-to-neuroscience cases from databases.

 

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Faculty Lead: Nita Farahany

Project Manager: William Krenzer

A team of students will use a variety of data sets and mapping technologies to determine a feasible location for a deep-sea memorial to the transatlantic slave trade. While scholars have studied the overall mortality of the slave trade, little is known about where these deaths occurred. New mapping technologies can begin to supply this data. Led by English professor Charlotte Sussman, in association with the Representing Migrations Humanities Lab, this team will create a new database that combines previously-disparate data and archival sources to discover where on their journeys enslaved persons died, and then to visualize these journeys. This project will employ the resources of digital technologies as well as the humanistic methods of history, literature, philosophy, and other disciplines. The project welcomes students from a broad range of disciplines: computer science; mathematics; English and literature; history; African and African American studies; philosophy; art history; visual and media studies; geography; climatology; and ocean science.

 

Image credit:

J.M.W. Turner, Slave Ship, 1840, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (public domain)

Faculty Lead: Charlotte Sussman

Project Manager: Emma Davenport

Ellis Ackerman (Math, NCSU), Rodrigo Araujo (Computer Science), and Samantha Miezio (Public Policy) spent ten weeks building tools to help understand the scope, cause, and effects of evictions in Durham County. Using evictions data recorded by the Durham County Sheriff’s Department and demographic data from the American Community Survey, the team investigated relationships between rent and evictions, created cost-benefit models for eviction diversion efforts, and built interactive visualizations of eviction trends. They had the opportunity to consult with analytics professionals from DataWorks NC.

Project Leads: Tim Stallmann, John Killeen, Peter Gilbert

Project Manager: Libby McClure

 

The American public first encountered the term “genocide” in a Washington Post op-ed published in 1944; since then, the word’s meaning has been circulated, debated, and shaped by numerous forces, especially by words and images in newspapers. With the support of Dr. Priscilla Wald (English), a team of students led by Nora Nunn (English graduate student) and Astrid Giugni (English and ISS) will analyze how U.S. mass media—particularly newspapers—enlist text and imagery such as press photographs to portray genocide, human rights, and crimes against humanity from World War II to the present. From the Holocaust to Cambodia, from Rwanda to Myanmar, such representation has political consequences. If time allows, students will also study the representation of collective violence in Hollywood film, querying the relationship between human rights and genre. The implications of these findings could inform future coverage of human rights-related issues at home and abroad.

Faculty Leads: Nora Nunn, Astrid Giugni

How Much Profit is Too Much Profit?

Chris Esposito (Economics), Ruoyu Wu (Computer Science), and Sean Yoon (Masters, Decision Sciences) spent ten weeks building tools to investigate the historical trends of price gouging and excess profits taxes in the United States of America from 1900 to the present. The team used a variety of text-mining methods to create a large database of historical documents, analyzed historical patterns of word use, and created an interactive R Shiny app to display their data and analyses.

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(cartoon from The Masses July 1916)

Faculty Lead: Sarah Deutsch

Project Manager: Evan Donahue

Maria Henriquez (Computer Science, Statistics) and Jacob Sumner (Biology) spent ten weeks building tools to help the Michael W. Krzyzewski Human Performance Lab best utilize its data from Duke University student athletes. The team worked with a large collection of athlete strength, balance, and flexibility measurements collected by the lab. They improved the K Lab’s data pipeline, created a predictive model for injury risk, and developed interactive web-based individualized injury risk reports.

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Faculty Lead: Dr. Tim Sell
Project Manager: Brinnae Bent

 

 

Vincent Wang (Computer Science, CE), Karen Jin (Bio/Stats), and Katherine Cottrell (Computer Science) spent ten weeks building tools to educate the public about lake dynamics and ecosystem health. Using data collected over a period of 50 years at the Experimental Lake Area (ELA) in Ontario, the team preprocessed and merged datasets, made a series of data visualizations, and produced an interactive website using R Shiny.

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Faculty Lead: Kateri Salk

Project Manager: Kim Bourne

Vivek Sahukar (Masters, Data Science), Yuval Medina (Computer Science), and Jin Cho (Computer Science/Electrical & Compter Engineering) spent ten weeks creating tools to help augment the experience of users in the StreamPULSE community. The team created an interactive guide and used data sonification methods to help users navigate and understand the data, and they used a mixture of statistical and machine-learning methods to build out an outlier detection and data cleaning pipeline.

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Faculty Leads: Emily Bernhardt, Jim Heffernan

Project Managers: Alice Carter, Michael Vlah

Aidan Fitzsimmons (Public Policy, Mathematics, Electrical & Computer Engineering), Joe Choo (Mathematics, Economics) and Brooke Scheinberg (Mathematics) spent ten weeks partnering with the Durham Crisis Intervention Team, the Criminal Justice Resource Center, and the Stepping Up Initiative. Utilizing booking data of 57,346 individuals provided by the Durham County Jail, this team was able to create visualizations and predictive models that illustrate patterns of recidivism, with a focus on the subset of the population with serious mental illness (SMI). These results could assist current efforts in diverting people with SMI from the criminal justice system and into care.

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Faculty Lead: Nicole Schramm-Sapyta, Michele Easter

Project Manager: Ruth Wygle

Have you ever read or watched a movie and realized that you have seen the same story before?  How do you know if you are watching an adaptation? A team of students led by UNC-Chapel Hill graduate student Grant Glass, will develop means to track the movement of adaptations within contemporary culture through machine learning techniques. Drawing upon a variety of textual information drawn from historical and digital sources, the project team will have the opportunity to work with many different types of data. Students will identify features of different master narratives, which will be used to demonstrate how certain stories are modified and retold over and over again. By creating this training dataset, the team will use algorithms to identify adaptations in previously unidentified works. This will allow scholars to better understand at scale how certain narratives are adapted into new stories and forms.

Faculty Lead: Grant Glass

Project Manager: TBD

Jett Hollister (Mechanical Engineering) and Lexx Pino (Computer Science, Math) joined Economics majors Shengxi Hao and Cameron Polo in a ten week study of the late 2000s housing bubble. The team scraped, merged, and analyzed a variety of datasets to investigate different proposed causes of the bubble. They also created interactive visualizations of their data which will eventually appear on a website for public consumption.

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Faculty Lead: Lee Reiners

Project Manager: Kate Coulter

Cassandra Turk (Economics) and Alec Ashforth (Economics, Math) spent ten weeks building tools to help minimize the risk of trading electricity on the wholesale energy market. The team combined data from many sources and employed a variety of outlier-detection methods and other statistical tools in order to create a large dataset of extreme energy events and their causes. They had the opportunity to consult with analytics professionals from Tether Energy.

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Project Lead: Eric Butter, Tether

Andre Wang (Math, Statistics), Michael Xue (Computer Science, ECE), and Ryan Culhane (Computer Science) spent ten weeks exploring the role played by emotion in speech-focused machine-learning. The team used a variety of techniques to build emotion recognition pipelines, and incorporated emotion into generated speech during text-to-speech synthesis.

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Faculty Leads: Vahid Tarokh, Jie Ding

Project Manager: Enmao Diao