An Integrated System for Accessing Large-Scale, Confidential Social Science Data

Project Summary

Large-scale databases from the social, behavioral, and economic sciences offer enormous potential benefits to society. However, as most stewards of social science data are acutely aware, wide-scale dissemination of such data can result in unintended disclosures of data subjects' identities and sensitive attributes, thereby violating promises–and in some instances laws to protect data subjects' privacy and confidentiality. 

Themes and Categories
Year
Contact
Jerry Reiter
Statistical Science
jerry@stat.duke.edu

Supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation Data Infrastructure Building Blocks program, we are developing an integrated system for disseminating large-scale social science data. The system includes:

(i) Capability to generate highly redacted, synthetic data intended for wide access, coupled with

(ii) Means for approved researchers to access the confidential data via secure remote access solutions, glued together by

(iii) A verification server that allows users to assess the quality of their analyses with the redacted data so as to be more efficient with their use of remote data access.

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Stress proliferation is a concept within the stress process paradigm that explains how one person’s stressors can influence others (Thoits 2010). Combining this with the life course principle of linked lives explains that because people are embedded in social networks, stress not only can impact the individual but can also proliferate to people close to them (Elder Jr, Shanahan and Jennings 2015). For example, one spouse’s chronic health condition may lead to stress-provoking strain in the marital relationship, eventually spilling over to affect the other spouse’s mental health. Additionally, because partners share an environment, experiences, and resources (e.g., money and information), as well as exert social control over each other, they can monitor and influence each other’s health and health behaviors. This often leads to health concordance within couples; in other words, because individuals within the couple influence each other’s health and well-being, their health tends to become more similar or more alike (Kiecolt-Glaser and Wilson 2017, Polenick, Renn and Birditt 2018). Thus, a spouse’s current health condition may influence their partner’s future health and spouses may contemporaneously exhibit similar health conditions or behaviors.

However, how spouses influence each other may be patterned by the gender of the spouse with the health condition or exhibiting the health behaviors. Recent evidence suggests that a wife’s health condition may have little influence on her husband’s future health conditions, but that a husband’s health condition will most likely influence his wife’s future health (Kiecolt-Glaser and Wilson 2017).

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View the team's project poster here

Watch the team's final presentation on Zoom:

 

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View the team's project poster here

Watch the team's final presentation on Zoom:

 

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