Information, Child Mental Health, and Society

Project Summary

Imagine a world where we understand how to detect mental health and developmental problems in early childhood so that we can intervene early in life and prevent future suffering and impairment. This is a challenge that can only be addressed by an interdisciplinary team of computational people with child psychiatrists and neuroscientists who can integrate and mine knowledge from cross-cultural and global data.

Themes and Categories

With autism, anxiety, and other disorders on the rise, it is imperative that children be diagnosed and treated as early as possible. We are working on making diagnosis easier, cheaper, and more accurate. Our aim is to make diagnostic tools accessible to the general population, empowering children and caregivers.

Project Outcomes

The “Information, Child Mental Health, and Society” project led by a Duke Bass Connections team concluded in June 2015.

Download the project poster (PDF).

Read more about the Bass Connections team.

Learn More

Screening for Autism: There's an App for That

Duke Researchers Developing App to Screen for Autism

Putting Big Data to Work in Autism Diagnosis

Apple video featuring the project

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