Development of Alliance Agreements in the Era of Outbreaks

Project Summary

This project summarizes the existing sample agreements from different institutions, analyzes the key contractual issues in the formation of alliances, and develops master charts of legal provisions to compare different approaches, to provide a reference for the formation of new alliances in the era of epidemic disease outbreaks. 

Themes and Categories
Year

Key Contractual Issues in the Formation of New Alliances

Project Team

Beibei Sun, Duke University School of Law, J.D.’16 

Mentor: Professor Julie Barnes-Weise, Duke 

Funding: 

Methodology

Reviewed existing model and related agreements;

  • Identified applicable key terms;
  • Identified major approaches to specific issues;
  • Developed master chart of specific terms from designated agreements;
  • Adapted existing terms to the needs of a multi-party alliance for development of vaccines and therapies to treat and protect against an epidemic disease outbreak. 

Conclusion

The legal framework substantially affects the outcome and efficiency of the alliance formation.

  • The four key issues are usually central of the negotiation.
  • Which approaches to adopt is determined by the purpose and scope of the alliance. 

Download the poster with more details about the project

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