Approximate dynamic programming

Project Summary

Intelligent mobile sensor agent can adapt to heterogeneous environmental conditions, to achieve the optimal performance, such as demining, maneuvering target tracking. 

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Wenjie Lu
wenjie.lu@duke.edu

The mobile sensor agent is a robot with onboard sensors, and it is deployed to navigate obstacle-populated workspaces subject to sensing objectives. The expected performance of available future measurements is estimated using information theoretic metrics, and is optimized while minimizing the cost of operating the sensors, including distance. Approximate dynamic programming and non-parametric Bayesian models are studied in the heterogeneous system.

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