American Predatory Lending and the Global Financial Crisis (Year 2)

Project Summary

A team of students, led by researches in the Global Financial Markets Center at Duke Law, will carry forward the work of a 2019-20 Bass Connections team to better understand the state of the home mortgage market leading up to the financial crisis. The Data+ team will expand the scope of their analysis outside North Carolina and begin the process of developing a complete quantitative portrait on the state of the mortgage market in Sun Belt states. Following the work done this year, the Data+ team would be largely responsible for creating visualization devices to visualize at the census tract level different mortgage market statistics for the entire US based on the NC version created this year. Additionally, a model would be created to identify whether a loan is predatory or not. The output for this project will be displayed on a comprehensive website that is currently being constructed by the Bass Connections team.

Project Lead:  Lee Reiners

Project Manager: Eric Autry

Themes and Categories
Year
2020
Contact
Paul Bendich
Mathematics
bendich@math.duke.edu

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