microRNA Host Response to Infection

Project Summary

Kelsey SumnerEvAnth and Global Health major and Christopher Hong, CompSci/ECE major, spent ten weeks analyzing high-dimensional microRNA data taken from patients with viral and/or bacterial conditions. They worked closely with the medical faculty and practitioners who generated the data.

Themes and Categories

Project Results

The team used statistics and machine learning to distinguish between viral and bacterial infections with high accuracy. This is extremely important work towards the goal of preventing overprescription of antibiotics.

Download the executive summary (PDF).

Video: Learn about the role played by project mentor Ashlee Valente

Disciplines Involved

  • Medicine
  • Statistics and Machine Learning

Project Team

Undergraduates: Kelsey Sumner and Christopher Hong

Clients:

Project Mentor: Ashlee Valente, Postdoctoral Associate, Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine

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