Learning to Search More Deeply

Project Summary

Weiyao Wang (Math) and Jennifer Du , along with NCCU Physics majors Jarrett Weathersby and Samuel Watson, spent ten weeks learning about how search engines often provide results which are not representative in terms of race and/or gender. Working closely with entrepreneur Winston Henderson, their goal was to understand how to frame this problem via statistical and machine-learning methodology, as well as to explore potential solutions.

Themes and Categories

Project Results

In order to understand Google's algorithm, the team web-scraped search results and used machine-learning to understand the importance of each feature. They then performed sentiment analysis to quantify public opinions from Twitter and used community-based crawling and seeding to collect information relevant to minority groups.

Download the Executive Summary (PDF)

Faculty Sponsor

Project Manager

Participants

  • Jennifer Du, Duke University Computer Science
  • Weiyao Wang, Duke University Computer Science, Mathematics, and Political Science
  • Jarrett Weathersby, North Carolina Central University Physics
  • Samuel Watson, North Carolina Central University Physics

Disciplines Involved

  • Sociology
  • Anthropology
  • Economics
  • All quantitative STEM

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